Control Line Fly-In, Almere, Holland

19 June 2004

Only couple of things marred this event, the worst being the fresh to strong wind that blew across the open landscape, causing the MVA (Modelvliegtuigsport Vereniging Almere) club flag to remain in permanently frozen horizontal position. I suppose the ranks of wind turbines that stretched from horizon to horizon should have given me some clue that this is a windy place. The second was the non appearance of the Fly By Wire people, who specialise in C/L carrier deck. No one could come up with a reason why they had not put in an appearance.

The morning began with a briefing on the where's and why fores of flying at the MVA site, that's the picture with everyone standing in a circle looking serious (look at the flag on the left of the picture to get some idea of the windspeed). The MVA is basically an R/C club and the C/L event is held on sufferance, and the understanding that if anyone turns up to fly an R/C model, the C/L flyer's move to another part of the field. The MVA is also a very well organised club as can be seen from the picture of the interior of their club house.

The wind situation led to a lot of fliers opting not to fly, and I for one don't blame them. After all, this is supposed to be a fun event, taking home one of these very nicely built and finished models as a bag of balsa scrap would definitely take out the fun element. The models that did fly tended to be of the profile-trainer, combat, all sheet team race, type models that could take a bit of rough and tumble.

jnr ringmaster For the first time in twenty years I had the opportunity to fly a C/L model. It was an OS.15 powered Junior Ringmaster 19 build from a Sterling kit. (actual model left)

What I did not expect was to get dizzy!

I have not felt dizzy flying a model since I first leant to fly, so many years ago that I can't remember. There where some things I could have done to help like fly inverted for brief periods or do multiple horizontal eights until the fluid in my ear canals stopped slopping about. But it wasn't my model, and I was barely in control of it at this point with the wind threatening to slam it into the ground at critical points in the circle. My sole aim in life at that point became to fly out the tank and not fall over. Quite a sobering thought, although it may have seemed the opposite from the way I was staggering about when the model finally landed: very embarrassing.

The second flight was not so bad, and small improvements like changing the handle for one that could be adjusted in flight, thus getting the models horizontal flight from 15m down to 3m helped with fighting the strong wind, as did changing the prop from 4" pitch to a 5", Herbert had forgotten to take off the prop he had used to run the engine in! Also more nose weight would have helped cure some of the models tendency to float forever if landing into wind.

The day ended with an impromptu team race, any type of model with a maximum 2.5cc engine on 52' lines. and see who is left standing at the end; great fun (see the last picture in the series) The model I was pitting broke a prop after a heavy arrival; that I could change; but the cracked fuselage/wing joint I couldn't.

In conclusion this is a very friendly event who's sole purpose is to raise the level of awareness regarding Control Line Flying, and well worth visiting if you ever have the opportunity. Take along a model, and you will soon be surrounded by people asking questions.


PLEASE NOTE: These thumbnails link to larger images approximately 600 pixels wide.
To return to this thumbnails page, just use the back link or back button on your browser.


Note2: for some reason I can't resolve, the back-link does not work properly in my version of Internet Explorer. There are no problems with Firefox. If you are experiencing problems with IE taking you to the top of the page every time, use the back button on the browser.
img img
Bruno van Hoek's 'Bluegrass Bird'
img img
img
Herbert Garittsen's fleet of models
img img img
img img img img
img img img img
img img img
Henk de Jong proving it was possible to manoeuvre in the wind
img
img img img img
Three pictures right by Robert-Jan van Poppelen
img img
Yours truly (left) with exploding haistyle, and Herbert Garritsen (right)
img
img img
Henk de Jong explaining the intricacies of a German rat race class
img
Home