Weatherman Speed
February 2008
Last update June 2010

The following information was lifted from the Barton Club Forum.
Photographs by myself.

weather man
David Catlow's epitomy of a class I Weatherman
 powered by a replica Mills 1.3cc diesel.

WEATHERMAN SPEED
(Peterborough Rules)

Dick Roberts announces:

For the 2006 season we (at Peterborough) are aiming to promote a low key competition for models from the past. This time the model is a real classic from 1948 and the idea is to run five distinct classes, starting with the original Mills 1.3 engine and going up to a maximum of 5cc. Timed from a standing start, this will be a form of “Proto Speed” event.

Model: Cyril Shaw’s “Weatherman” (as published by Ian Allen).
To be built as plan, with no scaling down, although wing area can be increased if desired.

weatherman plan

Mandatory: 1¾”dia spinner; 2 x 2” dia wheels; bellcrank fastened to hardwood spar built into wing; undercarriage approximately as plan; external controls.

Engines 

Class I: Mills 1.3 diesel only; all variants and replicas.
Maximum weight = 1 lb.

Class II: 1.5cc; any commercially produced diesel or glow engine. No performance enhancing exhaust systems or extensions.
Maximum weight = 1 lb.

Class III: 2.5cc; any commercially produced diesel or glow engine. No performance enhancing exhaust systems or extensions.
Maximum weight = 1 lb.

Class IV: 3.5cc; any commercially produced diesel or glow engine. No performance enhancing exhaust systems or extensions.
Maximum weight = 1.25 lbs.

Class V: 5.0 cc; any commercially produced diesel or glow engine. No performance enhancing exhaust systems or extensions.
Maximum weight = 1.5 lbs.

Fuel System
All Classes: Suction only. (NO crankcase pressure; NO bladders).

Propeller
All Classes: Any commercially available; wood, plastic, carbon, etc. (NO metal).

Timed Distance

Class I: ¼ Mile from standing start.

All others: ½ Mile from standing start.

Handle to be on pilot’s chest or chin by end of first lap.

Control Lines
All classes are two-line only, lengths as shown below:

Class I: Length 35’ 0” from centre of model to centre of handle, giving 6 laps = ¼ mile.

Class II: Length 42’ 0” from centre of model to centre of handle, giving 10 laps = ½ mile.

Class III: Length 46’ 8” from centre of model to centre of handle, giving 9 laps = ½ mile.

Class IV: Length 52’ 6” from centre of model to centre of handle, giving 8 laps = ½ mile.

Class V: Length 52’ 6” from centre of model to centre of handle, giving 8 laps = ½ mile.

Line diameters

Classes I to IV: 0.012”
Class V: 0.016”

Pull Test

All models to be subjected to a pull test prior to each flight, as listed:

Class I: 20 lbs.

Class II: 20 lbs.

Class III: 25 lbs.

Class IV: 25 lbs.

Class V: 40 lbs.

Number of Flights

Ideally, every entrant will have three flights, each comprising of two attempts. Conditions such as weather, number of entries, etc may however limit us to two or even one flight in some instances.

Note

1) A restraining strap between handle and wrist is mandatory in all classes.

2) Whipping after the end of the first lap, leading the model excessively, or shortening the flight path by any means will result in disqualification of that flight time.

Dick Roberts. 3rd June 2005. (Revised 25th November 2005)

Some useful information:

Weatherman plan & patterns http://www.model-plans.co.uk/
Dave Roberts email address davejohnroberts@tiscali.co.uk apparently he has a large stock of plans

A few examples of Weathermen.

As usual when comparing models from different sides of the pond, especially vintage ones, the Weatherman seems quite agricultural compared to a Perky design. Not so surprising when you consider the standard of living, climate and flying sites in the respective countries of origin during the period when they appeared. You can always tell a model that was designed to cope with grass by the positon of the wheels relative to the CG, and as can be seen the Weatherman wheels are nearly touching the prop. A new Miils 1.3 would have been quite a luxury at the time, and glow engines a rarity in the UK. 

weatherman

weatherman

weatherman

weatherman

weatherman06.jpg weatherman07.jpg

  

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